Marketing for Scientists: How to Shine in Tough Times

Category: The Public

  • Bill Nye’s “Don’t Teach Creationism…” Video Dissected by Business Communication Expert

    (This article was first published in Scientific American) Have you seen the new video by Bill Nye called “Creationism is not appropriate for children”? The video simply shows Nye standing in front of a white background and speaking, for two minutes, thirty seconds. Yet almost three million people watched it on YouTube, and many discussed…

  • Flame Challenge Faces Challenge: Negative Stereotypes of Scientists

    (This article was originally published in Scientific American) Scientists are aloof and socially inept. That seems to be part of the message of the video that won the Flame Challenge, a science communication contest run by the Center for Communicating Science. The winning video, made by Ben Ames, was just announced on June 2 at…

  • Entertainers’ Sticking Up for Science: The Help We’ve Been Pleading For?

    This article was originally published in Scientific American. In magazine reporting (and maybe science blogging), they say three events suffice to indicate a trend. So let me announce a new trend: popular entertainers are sticking up for science. Here are three trendsetting entertainers turned notable science advocates. Actor Alan Alda wrote an editorial in Science last week launching…

  • Interview with Science Rapper Kate McAlpine

    Scientists, The summer before the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) came online, a key LHC press officer (Dr. Katie Yurkewicz) went on maternity leave. Kate McAlpine, who was then a science communication intern half a year out of college, stepped in to help.  Her main duties were to arrange visits for U.S. journalists to the collider and…

  • Interview with Chris Lintott: Providing an Entry Drug to Science

    Scientists, Once upon a time, Kevin Schawinski and Chris Lintott were working with a large surveys of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, trying to classify them based on their shapes: elliptical, spiral, irregular and so on.  They ran into a problem.  The computer software for making these classifications kept making mistakes. The human brain, it turns out,…

  • Interview with USA Today’s Dan Vergano: We Don’t Sell Thinking Lessons

    Dear Scientists, Thank you for all your comments on the Marketing for Scientists Facebook group about press embargoes and their effect on scientists. Today I was lucky to get Dan Vergano from USA Today on the horn to hear his take on the matter–and get his pointed comments on the tumultuous state of science and science reporting. Before he…

  • I Can’t Tell My Editor the Truth: an Interview with Science Journalist Michael Lemonick

    Scientists, Last month, I blogged my interview with New York Times science writer, Dennis Overbye, about the state of science and science journalism.   Almost immediately, I got a note from another major science journalism guru, Michael Lemonick, who had some strong reactions.  I suggested he do an interview with me, and that’s what I have…

  • An Interview With Dennis Overbye

    To many scientists,  Dennis Overbye needs no introduction.  As science writer for the New York Times, he’s been a main bolt at the junction where science meets society. His well-read and well-written articles on physics and astronomy have helped launch many of our favorite projects and some of our careers as well. Overbye graduated from M.I.T. with a…

  • Putting Science Back Into The Broader Culture: Interview with Jennifer Ouellette

    Scientists, The journalists I’ve interviewed so far may have painted jarring pictures of the decline of print science news and less-than-flattering portraits of the science blogosphere. But this week, I have for you an interview with a science writer and blogger known for her fresh view of the science communication world, her glamor and playfulness. Jennifer…

  • An Interview with Science TV Producer Dana Berry

    I talked on the phone recently with television producer and director Dana Berry, who creates science shows for cable television.   I told him I was writing a book, called “Marketing for Scientists” and his ears perked up.  It seemed like he had some things he wanted to say to us on this topic.  So I asked…