Links for Chapter 14. How to Market Science Itself

Mythbusters

Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage from Mythbusters

Rising Above the Gathering Storm, Revisited: Rapidly Approaching Category 5

National Academies report on the state of U.S. science and technology as it relates to national competitiveness and security.  Published in 2010.

Unscientific America

Chris Mooney and Sheril Kirshenbaum’s book on how Americans are paying less and less attention to scientists.

Harris Poll of Most Prestigious Occupations

Scientists are number two, after firefighters.

Could a Penny Dropped Off a Skyscraper Actually Kill You?

This Scientific American article supports the Mythbusters’ conclusion: falling pennies are harmless.  Ball-point pens, on the other hand, are bad news.

BOINC

Open-source software for volunteer computing and grid computing.

GalaxyZoo

A citizen science website that allows users to see images from the Hubble Space Telescope nobody else has ever seen before.

Interview with Chris Lintott: Providing an Entry Drug Into Science

GalaxyZoo founder discusses the challenges and rewards of citizen science.

Hanny van Arkel’s Blog

Rockstar citizen scientist Hanny van Arkel blogs about astronomy and a variety of adventures.

Planethunters.org  Another one of my favorite Citizen Science websites.

Crowdsourcing.org

A site full of useful resources for researchers wanting to develop citizen science programs.

The Open Science Paradox

My take on the fundamental limitations of open science.

 

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